AFGHANISTAN

Afghan Women and Children Tolerate the Burden of Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan

Kabul – “Afghan women and children are paying the price of proxy games in the region with their basic rights of access to education, access to civil service, and access to health care.” UNHCR passes remarks on wrong and unjust proxy wars being fought in the region, using Afghanistan as the ground and Taliban as the cruel soldiers.

UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) – Asian Division has expressed huge concerns over the current situation of Afghan women and children. The organization views the segments as the primary victims of the current political crisis and change in Afghanistan.

Afghan women and children are paying the price of proxy games in the region with their basic rights of access to education, access to civil service, and access to health care. Certain restrictions on the bases of vague religious arguments are imposed that have specifically deprived and targeted women and children in Afghanistan.

In support of Afghan women and children, the organization has recently tweeted that women and children in Afghanistan are suffering and facing a radical humanitarian crisis and has emphasized that the International Community should refine their strategies with current realities and restore the livelihood in Afghanistan.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has urged the International Community to come up with innovative approaches to improving the livelihoods in Afghanistan so as to reduce the humanitarian burden in Afghan society. The organization has further called on the donor community to take the lead parts in supporting women and girls fighting on the ground in the sack of their basic rights.

Statistics indicate that since August 2021, Afghanistan is moving backward and millions of people need urgent humanitarian assistance.

The post Afghan Women and Children Tolerate the Burden of Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan appeared first on Hasht-e Subh Daily.



Source: Hasht-e Subh Daily

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